Fast Company—Furniture

In the TOC, the page numbers are offset in orange next to the teaser. Actually, much text is offset by orange throughout the publication. Other times, there are little orange rectangles to separate blocks of text. Above the header for each section, an orange dot indicates a new section. Fast Company often utilizes an orange triangle to indicate the beginning of stories. While the furniture varies from feature to feature, I noticed pink and green (rather than orange) triangles that acted as indicators for chunks of text. On The Recommender page, the tiny mugs of those who made product recommendations are in black and white with orange backgrounds. Although I’m not a fan of orange personally, I think it’s good to have a consistent element like this throughout the publication’s furniture.

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I know that on the “Wanted” page, there will be a photo of whatever product being featured along with the short blurb(s) of text accompanying it. I like when they utilize the photo as the entire background of the article, like below.

 

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Often times, the dek for a feature will be offset by a colored highlight behind the text. I noticed this in 2 of the 3 issues that I looked at; the 3rd was an exception because it was a special issue. I noticed text offset by a highlight in other parts of the issues I looked at as well. I really like this, because it’s a way to add other vibrant colors while simultaneously making the description of the article stand out.

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One other aspect of Fast Company’s furniture is the use of black lines. It’s a simple technique, but there are multiple black lines on virtually each page to separate blocks of text or highlight other areas of text. These are seen most prominently in the FOB, but they can also be noted in the well. These will vary in width, too. I think that this technique goes well with the look of the publication, in that it keeps things looking simple yet organized.

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-> A continuation of those lines, one might also note that there is a recurring “barcode”-esque element seen on many of the pages, particularly in the FOB.

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