FN #2: A1& Covers

the grid cover example

 

The Grid is a free, city weekly (distributed every Thursday) and daily website. This news publication is intended for people in their 20s and 30s, capturing the vibe and energy of the city at a street level.  Some of the many topics covered include politics, food, drink, culture, arts, real estate and more.  Unfortunately, I was unable to find the exact dimensions of the paper online.  It appears to be formatted as either a Tabloid or Broadsheet.

Ironically, no single grid format is used throughout The Grid.  Each story and section is organized in a way that seems to follow its own specific grid.  Some are 5 column, some are 3 column, some are 2 column, and some do not seem to follow a grid at all.  The Grids design is definitely modular.  There are clear sections of each page dedicated to specific stories.  No two pages are the same, yet each page is broken up very well.  Each front page highlights a single specific story with a large photograph and a bold headline.   A few smaller stories are also highlighted on the front page, using the headline and a small illustration, icon, image, or color block.  On every A1, clear rules or color blocks divide each story.

No matter what issue you pick up, The Grid’s covers evoke a non-traditional, bold, and modern feel that is simple and easy to read.  Each page utilizes a variety of different design elements.  You will find cutlines, rules, photographs, and illustrations scattered across each page.  In feature articles, the first sentence usually begins with a drop cap, and may include a pull quote, or reverse to accentuate the header.  Long type and stories are organized using clear vertical columns of written text.  Numbers and statistics are usually illustrated in the form of an infographic.  Short comments and cutlines are fairly uniform throughout, separated using rules and white space.

Hierarchy throughout The Grid is determined primarily by size.  Headlines and section titles are significantly larger than deks, bylines, and body copy.  For the most part, all heds, dek, and copy are in the same black, sans-serif typeface.  The only exception can be seen in section titles and story “tags”.  Both are displayed using a traditional serif typeface, in colors ranging from blue, pink, green, and orange.  Each of these colors are in accordance with one of the four newspaper sections throughout The Grid.

Overall, each issue is extremely consistent in style and personality.  Some pages may be completely different from others, however the same graphic elements are used across each issue.  The publication is always broken into the same four sections: A/City, B/Life, C/Culture, and D/The List.  However, the table of contents and the first page of each section may be the only pages that are formatted exactly the same in each issue.

– Alex Lo Grasso

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