TIME Magazine — Space

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FORMAT

TIME Magazine is a news magazine that publishes in both print and digital/tablet formats weekly. It reaches about 16,300,000 people in the United States each week, and its dimensions are 7 7/8 inches by 10 ¾ inches. The average page count is about 60 pages. This page count works because it allows for a few long form pieces as well as regular columns and shorter features. Also, since it’s a weekly magazine, it doesn’t necessarily have to cram, say, a month’s worth of news and relevant content, into one issue.

GRID

The left, right and bottom margins measure 3/8 of an inch, while the top margin is 1 and 5/16 of an inch wide. The grid varies from two to three columns, and it’s not seemingly based on story length. In the Feb. 1 issue, one of the long form stories has two columns of text, while another has three. The columns and short features stick to two columns of text. On two-column pages, the column sizes vary; they can be 2 5/8 inches, 3 3/8 inches, 2 2/8 inches or 2 13/16 inches. On three-column pages the columns are 2 3/8 inches. The gutters between columns are between 3/16 and 4/16 of an inch.

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CONTENT ORGANIZATION

Some of the recurring features in the front of the book are Verbatim, a collection of quotes from public figures, The Brief, a summary of US and world news and The View, commentary on current events. The well of the magazine includes the long features on news events, that can be 5-8 pages each. The back of the book includes the Time Off section, which is entertainment and pop culture news and opinions.

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LAYOUT

TIME Magazine does not like a lot of white space, there are often pull quotes, factoids, infographics or other data elements in the gutters between columns of text.

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For the long feature stories, there is generally one big photo on the opening spread and 2-3 photos throughout the rest of the story. So, the layout for the well is more text-heavy, while the other sections include more graphic elements and pull-out sections.

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Overall, the print magazine is organized very traditionally in that it has a straightforward layout and design. This works for TIME’s audience, which has an average age of 50, skews male (52% male vs. 48% female) and is higher-income and higher-educated. The colors are mainly black and red and sometimes yellow to create hierarchy, and displays information in a way that is easy to read and follow.

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